Bruchlast Versuche

  1. Used pinkTube breaking strength test by the International Slackline Association (ISA)

    A piece of pinkTube has been permanently rigged and sessioned for 6-8 months. It has seen between 3000 - 5000 leashfalls and was exposed to the sun for about 2 hours per day. It was located in a forest in France, near streaming water with high humidity. This piece of webbing has been break tested by the International Slackline Association. In the following article you can see the results:

    Webbing break tests Slacktivity pinkTube - ISA

    If you want to find out more about forces that are occuring in highlines, then you can watch the following video. Be aware that highlines rigged with low-stretch webbing and short highlines see clearly higher peak forces compared to high-stretch webbing ones or long highlines. 

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  2. Knots in slackline webbing

    TEAR IT UP

    Knot breaking by SLACKTIVITY

    Tear it up

    Author: Daan Nieuwenhuis
    Break tests: Daan Nieuwenhuis & Samuel Volery
    Pictures by: Daan Nieuwenhuis

    Introduction

    Since a few years the low-tension lines have become more of a standard. This new style brings new styles of rigging, one of these is tying knots in the back up webbing. But what does a knot in webbing actually hold? How does the knot influence the breaking strength of the webbing? As SLACKTIVITY we also had the goal to test out multiple knots to connect our back-up webbing to the mainline in our Type B webbings (redTube & pinkTube). This is done by making a knot in your back up webbing, and connect it to a T-Loop with a quicklink.

    WARNING: Knots can be complicated and hard to check properly. Don’t use them if you’re not 100% sure that the knot is correct, or if there is nobody that has the knowledge to double check it. Even after tying a knot 20 times, mistakes can still happen. Always double check each other rigs.

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  3. Vergleich von Karabinern

    Weil das Slacklinen noch eine junge Sportart ist und es noch wenig Material und Standards gibt die sich auf die Slackline-Anwendung ausrichten, wird Material von anderen Anwendungen (aus dem Sport- und Industrieklettern bis hin zu Industrieanwendungen) dazu hergenommen.

    Hier in diesem Beitrag wird gezeigt, dass dies zum Beispiel bei Karabinern nicht ganz unproblematisch ist und man sich nicht auf die Bruchlastangaben auf dem Material blind verlassen darf.

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